Saturday, February 27, 2016

What I Think of Being a Delegate so Far, Complaint

This has been confusing, and a challenge to learn how all this works. Because of the confusion and uncertainty, I almost didn't participate. Then I decided to go to the ward meeting and just vote for a delegate. When things started there were only 4 of us sitting at our ward table, and there were 4 delegate slots open. So we all became delegates. It was as easy as falling off a horse.

It was so easy, now I can understand why political parties do a poor job of informing the public about these meetings, and the other things. It is way easier to gain office if only a few friends shows up to these meetings, and people run unopposed.
James Parks Channel

In the DPNM rules one of the items says that notice will be given in the local newspaper, and 14 days in advance I think. That isn't good enough. That isn't working. No one knew about these ward meetings. The general public is left in the dark, and don't even know these meetings exist. That ward meeting should have been packed.

The Democratic party, and the other parties, should not be relying on old technology to disseminate information concerning meetings, events, issues and elections. It kind of reminds me of our use of fossil fuels. We are using archaic methods from the last century when better methods now exist. I really don't think it would be too expensive to place billboards at the 4 cardinal points of the major cities announcing things the people must be made aware of, like ward meetings. I don't think it would be to much of a bother if the local broadcast news announced these meetings in advance on their program as a public service. I think the parties can use 21st century and 20th Century methods to fulfil their duty of informing the public of these very important meetings and events.

I see all the media both local and national talk about who is beating who in the polls. They go on and on about this issue or that trying to sway the public's opinion, or inform of what is going on in general. They need to do more. How many times have you ever heard any of the news programs like KOB4 Albuquerque evening news say anything like this, "In politics, tomorrow the ward meetings will be held throughout the city. In order to find your ward meeting place call 505-000-0000 or visit, dem@politics.org (fake # & email)" ? I wager that you have never heard an announcement like that on TV or radio.

What about public access channels? I just looked and couldn't find anything in the form of instructions on the how to's of our political system. I just looked at the City of Albuquerque's TV show online. It is nothing more than a picture slide show powerpoint presentation with contact information for various government agencies, with some other public service announcements. I have to admit the background music is pretty cool. It is far from how I think such a program should be used.

People decry the fact that the citizens have not taken their responsibility seriously enough. That they need to participate in the political system if they want anything done. That's a fine thing to chastise the people of the United States for non-participation, then make that participation akin to entering some kind of secret kabal, where you have to dig for the secrets of its functioning because no one is going to volunteer the information you need to participate effectively. Ney, the entrenched don't want you to participate effectively unless that effect is in their favor.

Both of the Republican and Democratic parties owe it to the people to make real efforts to provide every bit of support they can to their people when it comes to the political process. The political parties need to be availing themselves of these resources. The people want to participate. The people want to think what they are doing counts. They are ready willing and more than able to learn, so teach them. That's part of what being a leader is all about I think. You have got to offer it all up, and show them how. The people for the most part don't even know where to start, so show them.

I do think the Democratic and the Republican party can do a better job of informing the public. The way things are set up now, it is like the system tries to exclude the public except for the final vote.

Personally, I am not liking the nomination process very much. It shouldn't be so confusing. The process should never leave things to random chance, i.e. the draw of the card. I got a super problem with the superdelegate system. I see it as undemocratic. All the convoluted rulemaking the parties do trying to gain some kind of unnatural advantage is sickening. That's part of the reason for such complex rules.

If I had things my way the entire process would be overhauled. It wouldn't be overhauled by the political parties either. They have proven time and again that they can not be trusted to keep good faith with all of the people. It seems they gravitate towards serving the interests of big business, letting the people's business sit on the back burner, or to be ignored entirely. That's why the rules are designed to keep party insiders elected, grassroots unelected and the people uninformed.

Because the political parties seem to be prone to be given over to big business interests at the expense of the common citizen, an inequality among the people is generated. Because the political parties can not be trusted to serve all the people, and seem to be prone to be given over to big business interests at the expense of the common citizen, the FEC should be tasked with writing the rules for the nomination process, and have them be uniform rules across all of the political parties, and the states. Have rules that any person of reason, even persons of reason who possess very little education, can understand without blowing brain cells. I would think that the reform of the political process that elects our government officials would be just as important as the other items in our political revolution. Overturning Citizens United, maintaining truth and integrity in government and media, political party donor transparency, ease of voter access to polls, information dispersal and uniform election laws all are vitally important to the interests and common good of the people.